Skip to Content

J. Webster Stayman, PhD

Associate Professor
Web Stayman
Research Focus Area(s): Imaging and Medical Devices
Research Interests: Medical imaging, device design and optimization, adaptive imaging, computational imaging, task-based acquisition, reconstruction, machine learning, and estimation theory
Contact
Research Interests

Research Interests

Medical imaging systems modeling, design, and optimization (including x-ray CT, cone-beam CT, phase-contrast CT). Interventional imaging and integration of patient-, task-, and device-specific information into imaging devices and workflows. Signal processing, estimation theory, and optimization — especially as applied to the development of sophisticated image reconstruction algorithms and acquisition strategies for high-performance on low-fidelity or sparse data.

Titles & Affiliations

Titles

  • Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering
  • Associate Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering
  • Director, Biomedical Engineering Master’s Program
Education

Education

  • PhD, Electrical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2003
  • MS, Electrical Engineering, University of Michigan, 1998
  • BS, Computer & Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1995
Faculty News

Recent Highlights

  • September 3, 2020
    When Johns Hopkins University announced the transition to remote learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic this past March, Web Stayman, associate professor of biomedical engineering, had just one week to transform his in-person, project-based Build an Imager course into a completely virtual, interactive experience.
  • October 8, 2015
    A $2.6 million NIH grant will fund the development of radically-improved CT imaging hardware and software that will deliver patient- and area-specific, low-dose CT scans.
  • May 21, 2014
    Armed with pragmatism and advanced computer modeling techniques, BME researchers have made strides in improving CT image quality while reducing X-ray exposure and other negative consequences of the scanning technique.

Read the Johns Hopkins University privacy statement here.

Accept