Graduate

Applied Research & Grant Methodology (2 course sequence)

This course sequence is designed to:

  • provide students in the one year, course-based program with the opportunity to obtain a high quality, realistic research exposure through “hands on” laboratory experience as well as through generating (and critiquing other) original research proposals.
  • provide a bridge, if desired, to thesis research in Year 2 of the M.S.E. program by allowing students and potential research mentors to become acquainted with each through research rotations.
  • all BME Department M.S.E. students (including Thesis Track students with the caveat that 24 credits beyond these courses are required for the M.S.E. degree) are eligible to take these courses (note that Thesis Track students are not required to take these courses, however); in addition, Johns Hopkins undergraduate students interested in obtaining the BME M.S.E. degree are eligible to enroll.

Curriculum

Credit for “two full courses” will be available towards graduation by completing the following courses:

  • 580.821 Applied Research and Grant Methodology I (Fall, 3 Credits)
  • 580.822 Applied Research and Grant Methodology II (Spring, 3 Credits)

Course Descriptions

EN.580.821 Applied Research and Grant Methodology I (Fall, 3 Credits). Students will select a laboratory to host their research rotation within the first two weeks (ideally, before the start of the term) and will participate in lab-related activities for a minimum of 12 hours a week; at least 6 hours a week is expected to involve “in person” interaction between the PI or other members of the sponsoring lab and the student. Activities will include attendance at lab meetings, preparation of a research proposal, and “hands on” experimental, computational, or modeling tasks: in addition, attendance at department research seminars and class meetings is required. Periodic reports on your research proposal/project and progress, as well providing feedback on your ‘colleagues’ projects and proposals will also be expected. A final research proposal (to be presented in the format of a NIH R21-type grant application) will provide evidence that a student is capable of carrying out advanced research by identifying a significant biomedical problem, developing innovative approaches to solve it, and then designing a relevant and implementable research plan.

EN.580.822 Applied Research and Grant Methodology II (Spring, 3 Credits). Students will participate in lab related activities for at least 12 hours a week.  These activities will include attendance at lab meetings, preparation of a research proposal, and “hands on” experimental, computational, or modeling tasks. In addition, attendance at research seminars and class meetings is expected. Finally, periodic reports on your research project and progress, as well providing feedback on your ‘colleagues’ projects and proposals, will be required. Finally a research proposal (to be presented in the format of a NIH F31 (or NSF equivalent) grant application will be required (it is expected that the application will be submitted to the funding agency for students interested in continuing their research career); it is anticipated that this proposal will include data generated by the student over the Fall, Intersession, or Spring term(s).