People
Kexin Yuan

Kexin Yuan, PhD

Associate Professor, Tsinghua University

Office: Medical Sciences Building, Room B218
+86-10-62783759
kexinyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn


Education

PhD, Neuroscience, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (2006)
BS, Biochemistry, Yantai University (2001)

Research Interests

The long-term goal of my research is to understand the operation principles of thalamocortical network in sound perception and sound-driven behavior. My laboratory studies how the non-lemniscal thalamus transfers contextual information to the cortex to dynamically modulate excitation-inhibition interplay, how the context-dependent thalamic modulation of the cortex would impact on cortical outputs, and how the thalamus transfers acoustic information to the limbic systems to influence animal behavior. My research aims to ameliorate the deficits of current deep learning models and shed light on the neural mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental disorders.

Publications

Cai D#, Yue Y#, Liu M, Wang Y, Su X, You L, Xie F, Deng F, Chen F, Luo M, Yuan K* (2018) Distinct anatomical connectivity patterns differentiate subdivisions of the nonlemniscal auditory thalamus in mice. Cereb Cortex. doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhy115

Cai D#, Han R#, Liu M, Xie F, You L, Zheng Y, Zhao L, Yao J, Wang Y, Yue Y, Schreiner CE and Yuan K* (2017) A critical role of inhibition in temporal processing maturation in the primary auditory cortex. Cereb Cortex. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhx057.

Xie F#, You L#, Cai D, Liu M, Yue Y, Wang Y, Yuan K* (2017) Fast inhibitory decay facilitates adult-like temporal processing in layer 5 of developing primary auditory cortex. Cereb Cortex. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhx284.

Yuan K*, Shih JY, Winer JA and Schreiner CE (2011). Functional networks of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in cat auditory cortex. J Neurosci 31(37): 13333-13342.

Froemke RC, Carcea I, Barker AJ, Yuan K, Seybold BA, Martins AR, Zaika N, Bernstein H, Wachs M, Levis PA, Polley DB, Merzenich MM, Schreiner CE. Long-term modification of cortical synapses improves sensory perception. (2012) Nature Neuroscience. doi: 10.1038/nn.3274.