About

A message from the director

Welcome to Johns Hopkins Biomedical Engineering

Leslie Tung, PhD, Interim Director, JHU BME
Leslie Tung, PhD
Professor and Interim Director
of Biomedical Engineering,
Johns Hopkins University

The faculty and students in this department have been breaking new ground in biomedical research for over 50 years and we strive to continue this history of innovation and discovery every day.

Currently, 480 undergraduates and 238 graduate students are enrolled in the Hopkins BME program, preparing themselves for careers in medicine, basic science, and industry.

Each year a new class of 120 freshmen undergrads from a stellar candidate pool, accept our offer of admission. The academic level of the program is extremely challenging — giving the best and brightest students an opportunity to obtain the most comprehensive training in biomedical engineering available.

The departments' new Biomedical Design Studio provides a premiere work space and resources for students to brainstorm, design, and develop prototypes for solutions to real-world clinical and global health challenges.

For our graduate programs, students are permitted to select any Hopkins faculty as a thesis advisor. We believe that both our students and the Johns Hopkins research mission are served best by placing our students in multidisciplinary teams, and we encourage them to find these opportunities

Our faculty members are world leaders in their respective fields of research which range from theoretical modeling of the machinery of the cell to the fabrication and implantation of engineered tissues in humans. I encourage you to explore the faculty research labs and review some of their publications.

You are welcome to come and visit! Baltimore is a great place to live and work. The exciting research environment and great people make for a wonderful and enriching experience.

If you have any questions about the department and the programs offered, please contact us today.


BME Professor and former director, Dr. Elliot McVeigh, explains how students work with doctors to tranlate medical device concepts into real-world patents.

 

The academic program is extremely challenging — giving the best and brightest students an opportunity to obtain the most comprehensive training in biomedical engineering available.